St. Charles Herald-Guide

Saints Rule

By Mike Detillier - December 13, 2006

If you weren’t convinced that the New Orleans Saints are the “ Real Deal” this season, you have to be convinced now after the boys in black and gold dissected the hottest team in the NFC, the Dallas Cowboys (42-17).

Other than a 77-yard touchdown run by Cowboys halfback Julius Jones early in the first quarter, the Saints totally dominated play out on the field.

And credit has to go to the Saints offensive line, quarterback Drew Brees and the best gameplan I have seen this season by a head coach in Sean Payton.

Under little duress most of the game Drew Brees, who grew up in Austin, Texas and was not offered a football scholarship by any of the state’s larger colleges in Texas, put on a show of a lifetime.

Brees completed 26 of his 38 throws for 384 yards and 5 touchdowns. The five touchdowns thrown against the Cowboys were the most ever by an opposing quarterback against Dallas in their 47-year history.Brees spread the football wealth all around hitting 10 different receivers in the 42-17 shellacking of the Cowboys.

The Saints running game also was a vital part of the biggest victory of the season. Deuce McAllister rushed for 111 yards and averaged 5.3 yards per carry, but he was almost overshadowed by the guy that normally is his lead blocker.

Fullback Mike Karney rushed for 1 touchdown and caught 2 passes for scores.

Three touchdowns from a fullback, who would have thought it?

Let’s not forget Reggie Bush in this equation either. The 2005 Heisman trophy winner rushed for 37 yards, averaging 6.2 yards per carry and he also caught 6 passes for 125 yards and 1 score.

It was a total team effort on offense and you have to give plenty of credit to the Saints offensive line who totally dominated the line of scrimmage.

On defense the Saints defense bent a few times, but they did a great job confusing young quarterback Tony Romo who had his worst game of the season completing just 16 of his 33 throws for 249 yards, 1 touchdown and 2 pass interceptions.

Give the Saints secondary a lot of credit for doing a great job controlling the Dallas-trio of Terrell Owens, Terry Glenn and Jason Witten in the receiving department also.

For a football team that was without star receiver Joe Horn and defensive tackle Hollis Thomas for the entire game, and quality starters like Marques Colston, Will Smith and Mark Campbell hobbled with injuries, the Saints had their biggest statement game of the season.

This Saints football club scored 42 points, the most ever on a Bill Parcells-coached team in regulation time and the Saints have now become the new version of “America’s team.”

It was quite a nationally televised showcase for Payton and Brees and the rest of the league had better take notice. The Saints are indeed the “Real Deal.”

The (9-4) New Orleans Saints, who would have believed it …


If you weren’t convinced that the New Orleans Saints are the “ Real Deal” this season, you have to be convinced now after the boys in black and gold dissected the hottest team in the NFC, the Dallas Cowboys (42-17).

Other than a 77-yard touchdown run by Cowboys halfback Julius Jones early in the first quarter, the Saints totally dominated play out on the field.

And credit has to go to the Saints offensive line, quarterback Drew Brees and the best gameplan I have seen this season by a head coach in Sean Payton.

Under little duress most of the game Drew Brees, who grew up in Austin, Texas and was not offered a football scholarship by any of the state’s larger colleges in Texas, put on a show of a lifetime.

Brees completed 26 of his 38 throws for 384 yards and 5 touchdowns. The five touchdowns thrown against the Cowboys were the most ever by an opposing quarterback against Dallas in their 47-year history.Brees spread the football wealth all around hitting 10 different receivers in the 42-17 shellacking of the Cowboys.

The Saints running game also was a vital part of the biggest victory of the season. Deuce McAllister rushed for 111 yards and averaged 5.3 yards per carry, but he was almost overshadowed by the guy that normally is his lead blocker.

Fullback Mike Karney rushed for 1 touchdown and caught 2 passes for scores.

Three touchdowns from a fullback, who would have thought it?

Let’s not forget Reggie Bush in this equation either. The 2005 Heisman trophy winner rushed for 37 yards, averaging 6.2 yards per carry and he also caught 6 passes for 125 yards and 1 score.

It was a total team effort on offense and you have to give plenty of credit to the Saints offensive line who totally dominated the line of scrimmage.

On defense the Saints defense bent a few times, but they did a great job confusing young quarterback Tony Romo who had his worst game of the season completing just 16 of his 33 throws for 249 yards, 1 touchdown and 2 pass interceptions.

Give the Saints secondary a lot of credit for doing a great job controlling the Dallas-trio of Terrell Owens, Terry Glenn and Jason Witten in the receiving department also.

For a football team that was without star receiver Joe Horn and defensive tackle Hollis Thomas for the entire game, and quality starters like Marques Colston, Will Smith and Mark Campbell hobbled with injuries, the Saints had their biggest statement game of the season.

This Saints football club scored 42 points, the most ever on a Bill Parcells-coached team in regulation time and the Saints have now become the new version of “America’s team.”

It was quite a nationally televised showcase for Payton and Brees and the rest of the league had better take notice. The Saints are indeed the “Real Deal.”

The (9-4) New Orleans Saints, who would have believed it …