Book Review: 'Blackout'

Special to the Herald-Guide

September 23, 2010 at 11:07 am  | Mobile Reader | Pring this storyPrint 

Lauryn DesChamps
Courtesy photo
Lauryn DesChamps
Reviewed by Lauryn DesChamps

"Blackout” by Connie Willis is a science fiction novel in which the characters travel through time. Although it is set during World War II, the characters are from the year 2060. Throughout the novel, various characters travel to different places, most traveling to areas around Oxford, England.


Oxford in the year 2060 is hectic with many historians traveling back in time. Michael, Polly and Merope are all historians traveling to different times of WWII. It is a common belief among all historians that when time traveling nothing will change the course of history. However, these historians soon realize that it is possible when Michael unintentionally saves someone who was supposed to die at a divergence point in the war, which causes drop sites to close and prevents their return to 2060. They all feel as if the direction of the war has changed drastically. “Blackout” tells of the amazing adventure of how one small step can change history.


Although this is a long book, it is intriguing and one of the best novels I have ever read. I recommend “Blackout” to anyone who truly loves science fiction. I am extremely pleased I read this novel.


Lauryn DesChamps recently completed her sophomore year in the academically gifted program at Hahnville High. She enjoys playing piano and trumpet, listening to music and taking pictures with her friends.

 

Editor’s note: Book reviews are published weekly in agreement with Hahnville High School gifted English teacher Deborah Unger in conjunction with the Brown Foundation Service Learning Program.




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