Open primaries are best for democracy


May 27, 2010 at 3:14 pm  | Mobile Reader | Pring this storyPrint 

It is time for the states in our federal governmentt to take full advantage of democracy by adopting open primaries in the election of U. S. senators and representatives, something Louisiana did many years ago under the leadership of former Gov. Edwin Edwards.

It would help end the partisanship of the two-party system which often chooses what one party wants instead of what the people want.

It is not a test of right or wrong when one side of the aisle jumps up and cheers while the other side stays seated quietly after a speach is made for or against an issue. It shows partisanship that does not serve our democratic values.

Louisiana adopted open primaries after Edwards had to win three elections to  serve as governor - - a Democratic first primary, a Democratic runoff and then a general election against the Republican candidate. That was too much and Edwards was right in pursuing open primaries in which all candidates, regardless of party, run against each other and the two leaders vie in the runoff which determines the winner regardless of which party they are in.

That would help reduce the amount of partisanship we have in our two-party system. People would feel freer to vote for a candidate from the party to which they do not belong if they were not restricted in primary elections. It would open the door to more bi-partisanship which is the essence of true democracy.




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