The tip of the spear of freedom ... the historical black church

Letters to the Editor
January 31, 2007 at 1:49 pm  | Mobile Reader | Pring this storyPrint 

D.B. Mollaire pastors at two churches in St. Charles Parish: Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Ama and Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church in Norco.
D.B. Mollaire pastors at two churches in St. Charles Parish: Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Ama and Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church in Norco.
Langston Hughes once said, “We are not where we ought to be, we are not where we should be, but thank God we are not where we were.”

Langston Hughes once said, “We are not where we ought to be, we are not where we should be, but thank God we are not where we were.”

Yes let us thank God.

God and the church have always played a major role in the lives of African Americans. So the church was the logical and appropriate place to start the Civil Rights Movement.

The church was the place for the Black folk to go to earnestly call upon God for spiritual and physical deliverance from oppression. History shows the backbone of the movement was the African American church in the community. The church provided a source of hope, strength and a moral compass for our fight for equal rights. Even in today’s society, the African American church is still seen as a beacon of light for social and political change.

As I close, I will give the words of Jesus our Savior that are found in Matthew 16:18, “And I say also unto thee, Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church: and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.”

Yours In Christ,

Pastor D.B. Mollaire

Comments? Write editor@heraldguide.com




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