Book review: “The Hunt for Red October”

Reviewed by Jon Benton

Special to the Herald-Guide
August 29, 2014 at 5:09 pm  | Mobile Reader | Pring this storyPrint 

Jon Benton
Jon Benton
The Hunt for Red October, Tom Clancy’s breakthrough novel, is a Cold War-era thriller following a Soviet’s attempt at betraying his nation and America’s attempt at covering his tracks.

Marko Ramius, a Lithuanian submarine commander, has been unhappy with his mother country for a while. He makes the decision that he will turn over his submarine, the Red October, to America, along with its top-secret information. The U.S. has to convince the Soviet Union that Ramius’s ship is sunk, in order to keep the USSR in the dark. Many obstacles are faced throughout this struggle by both the dissidents and the U.S., but the end result is completely worth it for the United States in the grand scheme of the Cold War.

The Hunt for Red October is a good introduction for how Tom Clancy would write his books. If you have ever read and enjoyed other Tom Clancy novels, this first installment of the Jack Ryan series is a must read. I would not recommend the novel for children, as the difficulty level of the reading is probably a bit out of reach, but I would highly recommend it for adults who are a fan of the genre.

Jon Benton is a senior in the Gifted program at Hahnville High. He enjoys sports, listening to music, and plans to be a sports broadcaster in the future.

Editor’s note: Book reviews are published weekly during the summer in agreement with Hahnville High School gifted English teacher Deborah Unger in conjunction with the Brown Foundation Service Learning Program.




View other articles written Special to the Herald-Guide

featured merchant

Landry's Outboard Motors & Repairs Service
Landry's Outboard Motors & Repairs Service Over 25 Years of Quality Sales, Service and Repairs on YAMAHA, MERCURY, EVINRUDE and JOHNSON Motors.

Hahnville’s living legacy is over 300 years old
Hahnville’s living legacy is over 300 years old
- 1100 views
Nineteen years ago, Richard Whitney Jr. and his wife took a look at an, at the time, undeveloped property in Hahnville adorned by a plush landscape of oak trees, and they decided they just might stay awhile.

Become A Herald-Guide Insider

Get breaking news, sports and lifestyles straight to your inbox