Book review: “Inherit the Wind”

Reviewed by Haley Morgan

Special to the Herald-Guide
July 11, 2014 at 9:59 am  | Mobile Reader | Pring this storyPrint 

Book review: “Inherit the Wind”
Inherit the Wind is a play about a courtroom drama that takes place in 1925. The main characters include a science teacher, Cates, two attorneys, and a pastor.

This powerful read reflects the Scopes Monkey Trial of the 20s and brings up the once-controversial issue of teaching evolution in school.

Inherit the Wind takes place in a small town in Tennessee. The setting switches among a street, the jail, and a courtroom. Science teacher Cates decides that he wants to fight for his cause and continue to educate the schoolchildren about evolution. The party opposing him is full of religious leaders and even a pastor. The lawyer whom Cates hires to defend him attempts to impose equality in the courtroom between Cates and the religious fanatics of the town. The result of the trail is shocking, even with the knowledge of how the actual trial resolved.

I enjoyed Inherit the Wind, and I would recommend it to those who are interested in American History and historical fiction. This educational play gives an interesting perspective on the famous trial of the early twenties.

Haley Morgan is a graduating senior in the Gifted program at Hahnville High. She plans to attend Louisiana State University and major in Biological Engineering.

Editor’s note: Book reviews are published weekly during the summer in agreement with Hahnville High School gifted English teacher Deborah Unger in conjunction with the Brown Foundation Service Learning Program.




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