School board travel seems warranted


January 27, 2012 at 9:52 am  | Mobile Reader | Pring this storyPrint 

If St. Charles Parish School Board members were to take off for Hawaii and other exotic destinations with bathing suits in hand claiming to be taking care of their official business, one would suspect that they are fiddling with taxpayer money. But such does not seem to be the case.

After some criticism recently, they claimed at last Tuesday night’s meeting that they have gained important knowledge and experience in the travels they took. Most of it was to conferences of national and state associations where they learned how education is administered in other areas of the country.

In most cases, the only way to find out how that is done is to come into contact with people who do it. And from such knowledge, they can choose the best methods for St. Charles.

In addition, they get to meet vendors who sell products and services that can make the school system here more efficient.

The cost of travel for all eight members last year was only $27,800. This is just a pittance of the overall cost of public education here.

That amount of money would be well spent if they managed to get a minimum of benefits from their travel sessions.

It seems logical that they should continue their excursions when such is the case. It gives them a broader outlook on what the future could and should be like at home.

As an efficient school system that provides high quality education to its students, St. Charles Parish should always be on the lookout for even better ways to do it in the future.




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